5 Cast Elements – Ring Series

Part of the course brief was to cast 5 of the same element and make some jewellery with them. This could be 5 in 1 making a bracelet or pendant, or could be a few different individual pieces. I decided to create a series of 5 rings using my cast faceted element. Below are some sketches of the ideas I had.


I designed the faceted pod in CAD and then 3D printed this at home, working out the exact size I was after. Although the CAD program tells you what size the piece is as you’re deigning it, I seem to work way better with the program if I can have the physical copy instead of trying to gauge it with a ruler in my hand and visualising the size. At the time I was experimenting with this, the college 3D printer was broken and I’d already 3D printed a couple of designs from the college printer which I didn’t like. However, using my printer doesn’t give a great finish. It’s perfect for what I need it to do but a lot of clean up is needed before or after if using the piece for casting.

I super glued a brass rod to the plastic piece to create the wax injection chamber then proceeded to make a rubber mould so that I’d be able to cast multiples (as I need 5 identical pieces). I then wax injected the mould which turned out great and sprued up my tree and had it cast.

 

 

The castings were in pretty bad shape, purely because of the 3D printed texture on them. However, using a vice and large file, I pinned the facets into the vice one at a time and filed the surfaces flat which made the pieces look miles better. I then began making my series of rings.

I originally wanted to set some flush settings into a couple of the rings with black and yellow 2mm and 2.5mm C.Z’s, however, I’d only done 5 of these previously and didn’t feel confident doing this without a backup ring in place. Also with time running out, I decided to leave this idea for now but may revisit it later down the line. My other thoughts were to oxidise areas and keum boo others. I’m not a fan of keum boo though so felt this was taking me down a style that didn’t fit my own. My final idea was to set pops of resin to the rings but I didn’t want to rush this with the exhibition approaching and decided for the sake of time and wanting the rings displayed at the exhibition, I’d give them a polish and leave them clean and simple. I’m happy with the results, I think the rings are a lovely design but would like to add a pop of colour later on.

I also granulated some silver then filed these to have a faceted appearance. I soldered these to a couple of the ring shanks. The ring shanks and stems were all given a hammered texture finish also using a ball pein hammer. Below is a little video of 4 of the completed rings in action.

Stevie.

 

 

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Brooch Project – Final Piece

For the final brooch choice I picked the score & fold with geometric shape. This piece is in-keeping with the work I’ve done over the year and hopefully will appeal to those looking to be more bold with their brooch/pin.

I used piercing, scoring & folding, oxidising, resin and reticulation techniques for this piece. (Below are the samples).

final 13

  • I used the disc cutter to create the base of the brooch. I used 0.7mm sterling silver sheet. I cut away a geometric shape to add detail to the back and also to allow the wearer to look through all the layers. I also pierced out from 0.7mm silver sheet a square pattern I’d created which includes a geometric shape. I used the score and fold method to bend these squares into the desired, box-like shape and soldered it to the circular base. I oxidised the inside of the square forms and then added to the geometric shape a layer of resin which I gave a yellow pigment to.
  • The Top piece was also cut from the disc cutter but a slightly larger circle was used. I cut a disc from copper sheet and then pierced a geometric shape out of the copper disc which I then added small chips of sterling silver to and melted and reticulated the silver onto the surface. I then added solder to the other side and melted that over the copper to cover it. I didn’t use silver ships as I wasn’t wanting the same ‘reticulated’ effect. I then domed the piece. What I love about reticulating silver onto copper is that it works differently to reticulating straight onto silver. I also love the rose hue it creates.
  • Our lecturer had already made the brooch frame which he then made a rubber mould of and cast multiple times so that everyone in class could make an interchangeable brooch. All I had to do to this was give it a little clean up and add some tube so that a steel pin could be inserted. I also oxidised the inside of the frame and the front rim and left the rest with a satin, silver finish.

 

This project is about getting men into jewellery. The brooches will be on display at the college exhibition on June 13th and then at the Elements exhibition later in the year. They will be available to buy will all proceeds going to charity for testicular cancer. As part of the exhibition we were asked to get men to model the brooches so I had my oldest brother and my 8 year old nephew model the brooch.

Stevie.

Brooch Project – Part 3

I’ve been playing around with samples. Below are some of the techniques I’ve been using. The main brooch frame is sterling silver which I have partly oxidised. I have created a domed top using copper which I have pierced out a geometric shape from. I reticulated pieces of silver on top of the copper and then domed it. I’ve used this top to place over the final samples.

Enamel

Here, I have created enamelled panels which can be swapped out for different colours or patterns.

 

Score and Fold, Reticulation & Textures

Here, I have used the disc cutter to create the base circle. I used a ball pein hammer to create the texture before cutting out the circle (so not to distort the circular shape) then domed it to fit the brooch frame. I then cut out a square pattern from copper. I placed pieces of silver on top and melted them creating this reticulated effect. I then scored and folded them in different directions and soldered to the copper dome.

 

Stone Setting

Below I have set an unusually shaped, synthetic stone. I cut out the base circle using the disc cutter and copper, I then flooded some silver solder on top to give me an idea of how it all would look together in silver, although, I was also contemplating oxidising the base black. I cut some 3mm copper wire and sawed it into 3 equal lengths. I soldered these to the base disc assessing the distance between the 3 pillars by eye and using the stone to gauge how close they should be to hold the stone in place. This was surprisingly pretty easy. I used a triangle needle file to saw into the wires (all at an equal height), just enough to pop the stone into place. Using my flat nose pliers, I pulled back one of the prongs slightly to insert the stone into the grooves and then moved the prong back into place. The stone is nice and secure.

final 10

Score & Fold, Oxidising and Resin

I again, used the disc cutter to create the base of the brooch. I cut away a geometric shape to add detail to the back and also to allow the wearer to look through all the layers. I then pierced out a square pattern I’d created with a geometric shape attached. I used the score and fold method to bend these squares into the desired shape and soldered it to the circular base. I oxidised the inside of the square forms and then added a layer of resin which I gave a yellow pigment to onto the geometric shape.

 

Blog on final piece to follow.

Stevie